• Summer Evening, 1886
  • The Man on the Balcony, 1880
  • Dance Festival, 2011 - Vezur
  • Negress, 1869
  • Gloomy Situation, 1933
  • Girls, 2011 - Vezur
  • Moonrise over the Sea, 1822
  • Dandelions, Ventas Rumba, 2011 - Vezur
  • Mona Lisa, 1507
  • Madame Camus with a Fan, 1870
  • The Buffalo Trail, 1867
  • Water Lilies, Green Reflection, Left Part, 1923
  • Fields of Gold, 2011 - Vezur
  • Dead Mother, 1910
  • The Star, 1878
  • Kelly Pool, 1903
  • The Sleeping Gypsy, 1897
  • The End of Summer, 2011 -  Vezur
  • Wheat Field With Reaper And Sun, 1889
  • Old Riga view, 2011 - Vezur
  • A Friend in Need, 1903
  • Ligo Evening, 2011 - Vezur
  • Deauville, The Basin, 1892
  • Lady with fan, 1918
  • Four Bathers, 1905
  • Sun Walk Over The Bridge, 2011 - Vezur
  • Embrace aka Lovers II, 1917
  • Tree of Life, 1909
  • Judith and the Head of Holofernes, 1901
  • A Carnival Evening, 1886
  • The Thames below Westminster, 1871
  • Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818
  • Richard Gallo and His Dog, at Petit Gennevilliers, 1884
  • Poppies, 1886
  • Mother And Child Aka Madonna, 1908
  • Adam and Eve, 1526
  • Antibes Seen from the Salis Garden, 1888
  • Le Pêcheur (The Fisherman), 1909
  • The Sky, 2011 - Vezur
  • Forest, 2011 - Vezur
  • Portraits at the Stock Exchange, 1879
  • Portrait of Felix Feneon, 1890
  • Lying act, 1917
  • Riegert aka Laima Clock, 2011 - Vezur
  • Breath of the Earth, 2011 - Vezur
  • Orange Trees, 1878
  • Flower Clouds, 1903
  • A Gust of Wind, 1883
  • The Vines, 1902
  • La Sybille, 1891

The Starry Night, 1889

The Starry Night, 1889

Vincent van Gogh

„The Starry Night” depicts the view outside Van Gogh’s sanitorium room window at Saint-Rémy-de-Provence (located in southern France) at night, although it was painted from memory during the day. It was not Van Gogh's first depiction of a night sky. In Arles, he had been proud of his painting of the stars and the reflection of the lights of the town in the River Rhône, one of the first results of a plan intimated to Emile Bernard in April 1888. He wanted to paint a starry night as an example of working from the imagination, which could add to the value of a painting: „we may succeed in creating a more exciting and comforting nature than we can discern with a single glimpse of reality”, he wrote. In a letter to Theo of the same date, Vincent was more explicit about the motif: „a starry night with cypresses or possibly above a field of ripe wheat”. With his „Starry Night”, painted in Saint-Rémy, he fulfilled that promise and did so at a time when he was more determined than ever to prove himself the equal of his fellow artists.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.