• Nabis Landscape, 1890
  • Woman with a Parasol and Small Child on a Sunlit Hillside,1874
  • Yellow Circle, 1926
  • Lady with fan, 1918
  • River bank, 2011 - Vezur
  • Breton Landscape - Fields by the Sea (Le Pouldu), 1894
  • Orange Trees, 1878
  • Landscape at Saint-Rémy, 1889
  • Forest, 2011 - Vezur
  • Almond Branches in Bloom, San Remy, 1890
  • Lady of the Flowers, 1895
  • Spring, 1879
  • Harvest Time, 1878
  • House of Blackheads, 2011 - Vezur
  • Old Town Back In 30's, 2011 - Vezur
  • Two Swans, 2011 - Vezur
  • Tram No 10, 2011 - Vezur
  • Portrait of Felix Feneon, 1890
  • Blue Dancers, 1899
  • Two Little Girls On The Beach, 1895
  • Negress, 1869
  • Riga at Night, 2011 - Vezur
  • A Friend in Need 2, 1903
  • Study of a Figure Outdoors (Facing Right), 1886
  • Saint John, 1892
  • Caricature Self Portrait, 1889
  • Lying act, 1917
  • Portraits at the Stock Exchange, 1879
  • Young Man at His Window, 1875
  • Portrait of a European Lady in Japanese Costume
  • Boreas , 1903
  • Midsummer Night, 1876
  • Evening in New York, 1890
  • Evocation
  • Bare Tree behind a Fence, 1912
  • A Gust of Wind, 1883
  • Poppy field in Giverny, 1885
  • Seacoast at Engure, 2011 - Vezur
  • Opera House, 2011 - Vezur
  • Lady with hat and feather boa, 1909
  • Water Lilies, 1906
  • Portrait Of Gabrielle Aka Young Girl With Flowers, 1900
  • Cagnes Landscape
  • Zwei Akte, 1890
  • When The Grass Was Greener, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Druidess, 1893
  • Dancers in Blue, 1890
  • The Starry Night, 1889
  • Beatrice, 1897
  • Garden Study of the Vickers Children, 1884

The Veteran in a New Field, 1865

The Veteran in a New Field, 1865

Winslow Homer

In October of 1861, he was sent to the front in Virginia as an artist-correspondent for the new illustrated journal, Harper's Weekly. Homer's earliest Civil War paintings, dating from about 1863, are anecdotal, like his prints. As the war drew to a close, however, such paintings as "The Veteran in a New Field" reflect a more profound understanding of the war's impact and meaning. Painting depicts an emblematic farmer who is a Union veteran. Most soldiers had been farmers before the Civil War. This man, who has returned to his field, holds an old-fashioned scythe that evokes the Grim Reaper, recalls the war's harvest of death, and expresses grief upon Lincoln's murder. The redemptive feature is the bountiful wheat - a Northern crop - which could connote the Union's victory. With its dual references to death and life, Homer's iconic composition offers a powerful meditation on America's sacrifices and its potential for recovery.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.