• Two Swans, 2011 - Vezur
  • La Sybille, 1891
  • Autumn, 1877
  • Tram No 10, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Rape of Europa, 1910
  • Sunflowers, 1888
  • Lying act, 1917
  • Riga at Night, 2011 - Vezur
  • A Friend in Need 2, 1903
  • Reclining Semi-Nude with Red Hat, 1910
  • Woman with Black Hat, 1909
  • The Haymaker, 1886
  • Forest, 2011 - Vezur
  • Bridge of Europe, 1877
  • Water Lilies, Green Reflection, Left Part, 1923
  • Harvest Time, 1878
  • Bare Tree behind a Fence, 1912
  • Vase Of Poppies, 1909
  • Portrait of Ida Rubenstein, 1910
  • Nude Egyptian Girl, 1891
  • Cagnes Landscape
  • Madame Camus with a Fan, 1870
  • Recumbent Nude, 1917
  • Walk Along The Sea, 2011 - Vezur
  • Dancers in Blue, 1890
  • Adele Bloch Bauer I, 1907
  • Old Town In The Snow, 2011 - Vezur
  • Midsummer Festival, 2011 - Vezur
  • Breton Landscape - Fields by the Sea (Le Pouldu), 1894
  • The Hope II, 1908
  • Landscape at Saint-Rémy, 1889
  • Independence Day, 2011 - Vezur
  • Four Trees, 1917
  • Portrait Of The Painter Max Oppenheimer, 1910
  • Portraits at the Stock Exchange, 1879
  • Negress, 1869
  • Boreas , 1903
  • Haymaking, 2011 - Vezur
  • Breath of the Earth, 2011 - Vezur
  • Richard Gallo and His Dog, at Petit Gennevilliers, 1884
  • Rosina, 1878
  • Girls, 2011 - Vezur
  • Adam and Eve, 1526
  • Self Portrait with Arm Twisting above Head, 1910
  • Flying people, 2011 - Vezur
  • The Last Supper, 1498
  • Young Man at His Window, 1875
  • Self Portrait with Hands on Chest, 1910
  • Summer Evening, 1886
  • Avenue of poplars at sunset, 1884

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818

Caspar David Friedrich

Friedrich's greatest accomplishment was his ability to turn landscapes into a medium of physiological and spiritual biography. Here, he includes his own portrait within his landscape as a lay figure seen from behind, a device intended to invite the viewer to look at the world through the lens of the artist's own personal perception. Friedrich was captivated by the idea of encountering nature in solitude in deepest revines, as here on the pinncacle of a mountain, which was about as far away from urban civilization as a European man could get. In his later paintings, Friedrich will continue to stress that the very idea of "self-expression" had to be associated with physical and spiritual isolation. The Romantics believed that any artist who wanted to explore his own emotions, had necessarily to stand outside of the throng of money-making, political gimmickry, and urban noise in order to assert and maintain their positions.

The painting will be delivered unstreched, rolled in protective & presentable case.